Change Management, Communications, and Stirring up Stuff

Yesterday I tweeted that I was going to lay low for a bit because I had stirred some things up. Without going in to too much detail, I commented on an internal blog post that referenced a big corporate change that I didn’t believe any real change was going to occur as I had not seen any modeling of the desired behavior.

Well, did that set off a flurry of activity! And of course that was the whole point of my comment right? And I only said what everyone else was thinking, as many people came to thank me.  What happened next is that my feedback was publicly acknowledged, I was thanked for speaking out, and I was even asked to help with the change effort.

What I want to know is, have you ever seen this happen?  A big change is initiated, there is a robust series of important communications, yet the expected behavior is not modeled for others to follow. I am somewhat surprised that this happens as often as it does. Just do a quick search on google and you will find all kinds of references to instances of this happening. You will also find that in most cases one of the most frequent recommendations for implementing a SUCCESSFUL change, is for the leaders to show others what this change looks like. They need to lead the way by doing what they say they are going to do, and asking others ” how can I help you” ?

This is where my #creative or #insane brain starts to churn. What if our Communications Plan had a section on the modeling of the behaviors? Included would be a description of what the modeled behavior needed to look like, who should do it, how often, what the expected results are and the success measures? Easy peasy.. it’s not rocket science. And then…well who needs a change management plan right? 😉

Just sayin….

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5 thoughts on “Change Management, Communications, and Stirring up Stuff

  1. Jim Harris

    Great post, Jill.

    In my blog post Common Change, which referenced the Heath brothers great book Switch, I wrote that change begins when our behavior changes.

    Therefore, kudos for speaking up about how that big corporate change wasn’t going to become real without modeling the desired behavior.

    Best Regards,

    Jim

    Reply
    1. sheezaredhead Post author

      Sorry for the late response Jim. I had an extra 2 minutes on hand and just for the heck of it looked at my spam folder. Lo and behold there you were. WTH eh? I told them (wordpress) to leave you alone!!
      Thanks so much for the great comment Jim. As always, your posts are part of my inspiration, 🙂

      Jill

      Reply
  2. Vivisimo_Inc

    Love it! There is always one love brave soul ready to speak up. I think if organizations create a culture where ideas and thoughts can be shared openly without the fear of backlash we can take innovation and collaboration to the next level.

    Reply
  3. sheezaredhead Post author

    Thanks so much for the encouragement! And I agree completely with your statement that ideas and thoughts shared openly encourage creativity and collaboration. Even if others don’t feel comfortable sharing their thoughts, I will continue to share mine. I hope that leading by example will show others the way.

    Thanks!

    Reply
  4. newsocialmotion

    No, I haven’t seen a lack of modeling the change. However, I have recruited at least one individual who questioned our vision when I was formulating a new press club, back in the day — wanting his commitment and energy to lend momentum rather than be distracting from an overall goal. So I say it is good for them to have included you in the effort!

    Meanwhile, if you have thoughts about some of the experiences I tried to capture recently in blogging about points like these to consider in rolling out changes, I would love to hear: http://newsocialmotion.wordpress.com/2010/10/26/the-process-and-the-goal/.

    Thanks,

    Nancy

    Reply

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